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  • Cinnamon Bark Ceylon Essential Oil - Cinnamomum Zeylanicum - 1 oz / 30 ml 100% Pure Undiluted Therapeutic Grade.
  • Cinnamon Bark Ceylon Essential Oil - Cinnamomum Zeylanicum - 1 oz / 30 ml 100% Pure Undiluted Therapeutic Grade.

Plant Guru

Cinnamon Bark Ceylon Essential Oil - Cinnamomum Zeylanicum - 1 oz / 30 ml 100% Pure Undiluted Therapeutic Grade.

Plant Guru

Cinnamon Bark Ceylon Essential Oil - Cinnamomum Zeylanicum - 1 oz / 30 ml 100% Pure Undiluted Therapeutic Grade.

¥11,500 ¥6,900 Save: (40.0%)
¥6,900 ¥11,500 Save ¥4,600 (40.0%)
Delivery Time: 12-18 days

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Delivery Time: 12-18 days

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Product Description Product Description
  • Botanical Name: Cinnamomum Zeylanicum - Origin Sri Lanka
  • HIGHEST SUPERIOR QUALITY ESSENTIAL OILS - STRICT QUALITY CONTROL !!!
  • ALL OUR ESSENTIAL OILS ARE 100% PURE & NATURAL THERAPEUTIC GRADE. NO ADDED INGREDIENTS
  • WE NEVER SACRIFICE QUALITY FOR PRICE. "ABSOLUTELY NO" SYNTHETICS, CHEMICALS, CARRIER or BASES ADDED
  • OVER 140 DIFFERENT 100% PURE NATURAL ESSENTIAL OILS , GIFT SETS AND STATER KIT IN TOP 6, 14, 32, 64
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Customer Reviews

A Hit!! Excellent band of cinnamon bark. I use it (along with unrefined coconut oil) as one of my alternative remedies for a toenail fungus. 5I love all the Plant Guru Essential Oils I love all the Plant Guru Essential Oils.. After extensive researching of essential oil companies.. Plant Guru is up there at the Top in Quality! Two Thumbs up! 5This is a repurchase and one of my favorite Plant Guru essential oils This is a repurchase and one of my favorite Plant Guru essential oils, to diffuse, a drop in my coffee, mix, blend massage- it is a fantastic anti-bacterial antiviral it is a very versatile oil. 5No 'SIN" in This Cinnamon YES to this Cinnamon! Good Strong Scent for use as an Aromatic OR if you wish to use as an addition to a personally made muscle rub it will need to be carefully diluted as it IS HOT! (and Hot is Good for Sore/Strained muscles). Also the Company Owner: Mr. Tommy Eustice, will be sending you a personal follow-up email just to check in to see if You're happy with it. (some might say That's Hot Too) 5Helps with Foot Care I use the cinnamon bark oil for my feet. Of course I dilute it with fractionated oil and apply it mainly on the front of the foot. The anti-septic keeps toes clean and fungus free. Recommend it. 5Love it!! Finally found a good cinnamon oil!!! Love love love! I was nervous to purchase bc I was struggling to find a cinnamon essential oil that smelled nice, and this one is perfect finally!!! Smells like red hot candies or maybe big red gum. I am loving it!!! It's not as potent, so I have to use 6-7 drops to really smell it from my diffuser. But I absolutely love it and will be buying a larger bottle once my small one runs out. So glad I found this!! It's so homey and delightful!! :))) 5Great cinnamon smell This smells so good! I bought another brand that smelled horrible, so I was very happy when I smelled this. I really like the dropper top, too. It puts out a steady stream of drops when you turn it over (maybe 2 per second?), so you don't have to keep shaking or tapping the bottle. Just turn it over, count, and turn it back. Easy! 5Is it supposed to smell this way? Chemical-Spice scent, not what I was looking for. :( I'm not sure if we received a "turned" batch, or if it is supposed to smell this way, but the bottle we received has a very chemical-type smell to it, even though it is supposed to be 100% pure. Not sure if it is something done in the processing, or what, but it smells NOTHING of cinnamon. There is a slight "spice" scent underneath the chemical smell, but nothing that I would want to diffuse for a scent in my house. The goal was to use this to make my own "cinnamon scented pinecones", like the delicious smelling ones that are found in the floral department at Safeway. Thought this would be a great way to make a large batch for a fraction of the cost. Would have been a good idea if the scent had actually been right. The bottle is a nice bottle, and did not leak in the packaging, so that is a good thing. And the dosing topper inside the bottle is nice so you don't spill the whole thing if it were to tip over. That's the only good thing I have to say about this order, unfortunately. Disappointed! 1I was hoping this smelled like Christmas morning kind of cinnamon smell I was hoping this smelled like Christmas morning kind of cinnamon smell, but it didn't. Perhaps I'm looking for a certain cinnamon smell, I'm not sure, but I didn't like this cinnamon smell. It didn't smell alluring, in any musky kind of way, nor did it smell at all sweet kind of cinnamon smell. It smelled like it was old, stale cinnamon for some reason. I'm just not happy about this oil. 2Seems OK, But Too Much Information is Lacking I am now officially studying to become a clinical herbalist, an adding an aromatherapy certification as I go. I've used some essential oils for nearly 20 years now, and have been studying them in earnest for at least five. I look critically at all of the oils I purchase, no matter the reason, and have learned several things about what one should look for when trying to buy high-quality oils.It is important to note that I am not affiliated with any company, nor do I sell oils for any brand. I have used oils from the MLM companies as well as many of the companies that sell here on Amazon and their own websites. I do have some companies that I prefer, but that is because they have proven themselves, not because I have any financial or personal relationship with any of them.Paper Test: This is a simple one to do at home, and weeds out those companies that add carrier oils to dilute pure essential oils. It's not perfect, but I do it for two reasons. First, it helps me to discern when something like coconut oil (most common) has been added. Second, when I am able to compare two oils, like two peppermints where one is of known quality, I can see whether they differ in color, viscosity, or true scent (not straight out of the bottle).Labeling: In the US, there is no agency, public or private, that defines things like therapeutic grade or even pure . A pure lavender oil can just as easily be part lavender, part something else, and there's no way to know except to study and use the oils, or look for a company that offers a whole lot of information. Conversely, a company using words like therapeutic grade may be referring to a true, pure, high-quality oil, and some companies have even trademarked badges to show this. Unfortunately, they mean nothing in reality, because this does not indicate anything sinister. Some grate companies use these words, and so do some really bad ones.Information: The very best companies give you more information than you'll know what to do with at first. I look for botanical (Latin) names, the place where the original plant was grown, and the part of the plant that was used. After those basics, I check to see whether the company offers the proper warnings for each oil along with the benefits, and look for whether the plant was grown organically and harvested responsibly. Finally, I want to know that I can look at the GC (Gas Chromatograph) and MS (Mass Spectrometer) test results for the specific batch of oil they used to make my bottle. At a minimum, test results from the supplier are a must. For those of us who actually study the oils and use them to help ease the need for lab-created medicines, it is vital that we are able to see the actual components of each oil.Organic: Even if you buy conventionally-grown veggies and skip past the organic section of the supermarket mumbling about hippies , organically-grown plants are a must when they're going to be distilled into essential oils. In some cases, it is impossible to get certification, so I look for the company to tell me about how those things are grown. I understand that the labeling is expensive and time-consuming, and if the company is willing to open up about growing method or harvesting techniques, I'm OK with that. I'm not particular about having the government approve it.Price: I know, we all want a bargain. And there are some out there. But consider the fact that it can take up to 155 POUNDS of rose petals to create one DROP of rose otto , or what most of us know as rose essential oil, it is important that you consider what that means to the price. Some things, like citrus oils, are easier to come by and should be less expensive. But when you consider that boswellia sacra, or sacred frankincense, is best grown in the middle east, and that the trees must be properly bled to avoid killing them, and that the resin must then be dried before distillation, and that at some point it must all be shipped to wherever the company is, you're not likely to get a quality bottle for $20. Companies that sell all of their oils for the same price are very suspect, because oranges from Florida are far less costly to obtain than properly-harvested German chamomile. Either you're paying too much for the orange, or the chamomile isn't right.Scent: In general, scent is NOT a good indicator of a quality oil. I know, I know, it smells like cinnamon and its really strong, so it must be good cinnamon, right? Wrong. Frankly, human noses just aren't that sensitive. There are folks trained to notice even slight differences in scent, both perfumers and highly-trained aromatherapists, but I know darn well that I fell into this trap when I first started and wound up using a peppermint essential oil that was actually a different mint that just smells like peppermint. This is a good example, actually, because true peppermint doesn't just smell like candy canes, it also has hints of the green herbaceous notes from the other beneficial compounds that exist in the plant. I do use scent in testing, now that I've spent a lot of time comparing and studying. Scent IS good for detecting really bad oils, like those with bits of plant matter that have fermented or those with carrier oils that have gone rancid.Beyond that, because there is no private agency governing the word pure , you could be getting an oil that has been scented with something else, either natural or not-so-much, to boost the scent of a poorly-distilled or harvested oil. This will make your oil smell like it should, and could be harmful if used internally, topically, or inhaled through a diffuser. Also, some very beneficial oils just don't smell good. Helichrysum smells of turpentine, and Vitex has been said to smell like rotten cabbage, but they're supposed to smell like that when they contain the beneficial compounds that kill germs and help balance hormones. So just because it doesn't smell pretty doesn't mean it isn't a great oil.GRAS: Shorthand for Generally Regarded As Safe , the GRAS list is published by the FDA and lists ingredients generally regarded as safe for consumption in the amounts used for flavoring and preserving food. If you Google GRAS essential oils , many bloggers have extracted the essential oils from the government list so you don't have to dig for it. While internal use of essential oils is highly-contested, looking for a company that tells you whether or not their oil is included on the GRAS list is important to me. We all eat essential oils every day, whether it's a twist of lime with your gin and tonic or some basil on your pizza. The question is in concentration; as I said above (under Pricing), it takes a whole lot of plant to make a little essential oil. Taking oils internally should only be done if you have researched yourself, are under the care of a practiced herbalist, naturopath, or aromatherapist, or you're adding a couple of drops to a frosting recipe for flavor. If you choose to use essential oils internally, please ensure that those oils are organic, and purchased form a company that gives you all the information. Of course, this is a personal choice. I sometimes talk about tasting an oil, and you should know that is only done with oils whose origin I do not question, in proper (very small) amounts, and properly diluted. If you choose not to do so, that's great too.I talk a lot about things being grown properly or harvested the right way . This is important, because two really pure essential oils from the same kind of plant can contain very different compounds if they aren't treated well. In some cases, this means ensuring the right kind of soil and environment. Other times, plants should be grown in the nations and places from where they originated in order to ensure top quality, even if that place isn't the US. Some plants experience peak essential oil concentration early in the morning, and must be picked then. Other plants require some drying, and some require distilling as soon after picking as possible. So you may get a really pure essential oil that doesn't work because it doesn't contain the compounds it should due to something as simple as a late-afternoon harvest.Bear in mind that essential oils and other natural remedies don't work the same way for every person. Just like drugs from the store or prescription medication, some things work better for some people while others need to keep trying. Even the best drugs science has to offer don't save everyone, and the same is true for herbs and oils. Please don't let someone else's responsiveness to a certain thing make you believe it should automatically work for you, nor should you let its failure to work for them dissuade you from giving it a shot. Personally, I'm allergic to lavender, one of the most commonly-used essential oils and scents, so I have to research other herbs that work for the conditions where I might otherwise use lavender.About This Oil Specifically:Information: The Plant Guru website does give some essential information, but also leaves out some that I would like to see. I have the proper Latin name, country of origin (China), method of distillation (steam), and what part of the plant was used (bark). These are all expected, except for the part where it comes from China. Good cinnamon is grown in China, but it is also grown in a lot of places that don't violate human rights on the level China is known for. Since this is available from other places, I would sure appreciate not giving my money to a place like that.Warnings: Cinnamon oil should be used with great caution in any topical use. It is a hot oil and can burn the skin if not properly diluted. This warning is NOT on the website.Test Results: I e-mailed Plant Guru several weeks ago, asking for specific GC/MS test results. While the website says they do testing, there is no place on the website to get that information, and they have not replied to my e-mail. This means that while testing might be done, you don't actually know it. It also means that if you're looking for high concentrations of certain components you can't see if they're in here, and that this could easily be contaminated with pollutants or pesticides from the plant.Organic: There is no indication on the bottle or the website indicating that this was grown organically. The site FAQ section does say that none of their oils are made from plants that are treated with pesticides, but says nothing of how the plants are actually grown.Smell: This does smell like other, quality, cinnamon oil I have used, and did not show signs of fermentation (which would be odd in a cinnamon) or rancidity.Paper Test: Tested against a cinnamon of the same type from a known quality seller, this cinnamon behaved in almost exactly the same way. It was quite a bit darker in color, but that could simply be an indication of a difference in growing region. There was no sign of dilution, nor were there bits of plant matter to indicate improper distillation.Taste: This is cinnamon, and if I were more certain of its quality I would have added a drop to some honey and stirred a bit into my morning tea to tell you how it compares. However, because I cannot see the test results and am uncertain about the growing methods, I choose not to ingest this oil. That's a shame, because cinnamon frosting is fantastic on cake, and I love to add it (in less-than-a-drop amounts) to my tea.Price: Currently selling for about $8 on the website, this is CHEAP. If you look at the cost of cinnamon sticks, even in bulk quantity, you could not buy enough for $8 to distill 10ml of essential oil if you owned a still. I would expect to pay closer to $18-$20 for this amount of cinnamon essential oil, though the companies I prefer do not source from China which could make a difference. Remember that they're also paying for the bottle, labeling, website, etc, and the very low price makes me a little nervous. But, if you're just looking to add this to a scent blend, then it might not be as important to you as it is to me.Cinnamon is a fantastic addition to household cleaners, natural pesticides for the garden, and makes a lovely blend with ginger, bergamot, and cardamom for fall and holiday diffusing. I will diffuse this for scent, but will not count on it for healthcare uses.I am a product tester specializing in natural products, and did receive a complimentary sample for the purpose of testing and review. To maintain my reputation and integrity, I do test and use anything I recommend, I do consider the full price of an item as I review, and I am never paid for or obligated to give any product a positive review. I hope you found this information helpful, and thanks for reading my review! 3Good cinnamon oilSmells good (diluted of course). Great addition to essential oil recipes that call for cinnamon OR just cinnamon alone in a room diffuser OR diluted in jojoba oil and added to a necklace diffuser5
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